Monthly Archives: October 2017

Aging-In-Place Home Ideas

Aging-In-Place can be made easier with a few small additions or enhancements to each room in your home. As we age it helps to consider accessibility, which is easier to achieve with a simple layout, free space, grab bars, and good lighting throughout all rooms. Let’s take a look at some specific rooms.

Kitchen:
The kitchen can be made more accessible by changing the height of cabinets and appliances, and ease of access to items inside of cabinets.

If you have a budget for renovation, it may be worth consulting a Certified Aging-In-Place Specialist or your local cabinet-maker.

A few smaller installations you can do to help someone age-in-place in their kitchen include:
• a shallow/motorized sink
• Hands-free or lever-handled faucet
• Easy-to-reach water filtering devices
• “D” shaped pulls/handles on cabinets, doors, and drawers
• Pull-Out Shelves to Lower and Upper Cabinets

All appliances should be well-lit, easy to use, and easy to see!

Bathroom:

Plan for the use of canes, wheelchairs, walkers or similar assistive devices by making sure the bathroom has plenty of free space.

Ensure the toilet is at a proper height or purchase a seat extender.

Installing grab bars is an easy and economic way to increase safety in the bathroom. They can be placed on the interior or exterior of the tub or shower, as well as near the toilet to help with sitting and standing. Grab bars are no longer all cold and metal- today many styles and colors are available to match your taste.

Shower seats, anti-slip coating, and adjustable shower heads can make showers much more accessible. walk-in tubs can also be considered.

Bedroom:
Safety handles can be installed on the bed to allow easier access and reduce the potential for falling. Much like grab bars, these handles no longer look so clinical and can complement the decor of the room.

Having a working phone beside the bed may also be important in case there is a need to call for help. this phone should be corded or have a backup battery in case of power outage.

Cleaning out clutter in bedrooms is key! Storing heavy items or items you might use regularly on shelves can lead to accidents or things falling. Closets and Bedrooms should, again, be well-lit to avoid the possiblity of tripping!

Looking for more ideas? Head over to:

https://ageinplace.com/at-home/

https://www.aarp.org/home-garden/housing/info-01-2011/aging_in_your_own_space.html

https://www.houzz.com/aging-in-place http://www.nextavenue.org/8-things-consider-remodeling-age-place/

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PRN Medications – An Introduction

Some medications come with specific instructions for use every day, such as “Take 1 tablet by mouth every 6 hours.”

Other medications are only used when needed for a specific situation, such as when you have a cold, allergies, constipation, or pain. Some of these medicines are prescribed for you by your physician while others can be purchased at your local pharmacy.

These medications that are taken “as needed” are known as “PRN” medicines. “PRN” is a Latin term that stands for “pro re nata,” which means “as the thing is needed.”

 

If you are prescribed a medicine to take “only as needed,” the pharmacist should provide you with clear instructions about how and when to take it. Some examples for PRN medications include:

acetaminophen

albuterol

alprazolam

aluminum hydroxide

bisacodyl

cetirizine

cyclobenzaprine

diazepam

diphenhydramine

docusate

hydrocodone

ibuprofen

loperamide

lorazepam

magnesium hydroxide

metaxalone

morphine

nitroglycerin

ondansetron

oxycodone & combinations

polyethylene glycol

prochlorperazine

pseudoephedrine

sildenafil

sumatriptan

tramadol

trazodone

zolmitriptan

zolpidem

Patients  often like to be mindful of when they last took their dose of PRN Medication, since they are not taking it on a regular schedule. The e-pill Kitchen Safe is a tamper-resistant pill box and count-down timer that can ensure patients do not take too many pills. It will “lock out” the patient from taking their medication until a certain interval of time has passed.

The e-pill TimeCap is a small cap that fits on a standard prescription bottle. It displays the last time that the bottle was opened, so the patient knows exactly how long it has been since they took their medication.

More tech-savvy patients can also try the App Pill Logger, which allows the user to record a history of what meds have been taken. This may be useful if you are using several PRN Medications.

Remember to always ask your pharmacist if you have a question about how often PRN Medications should be taken!